Workplace Bullying and Job Attitudes: The Moderating Role of Coping Strategies

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Jaesub Lee
Jingpei Jillian Lim

Abstract

The underlying mechanism through which workplace bullying impacts employee attitudes (job satisfaction and affective commitment), health and well-being, and behaviors has been theorized little. This study adopted the stress-coping theory framework at the individual level that casts workplace bullying as a negative stressor toward which an individual is motivated to expend cognitive and behavioral energy to cope. When coping is not successful, the stress from workplace bullying continues and leads to negative consequences in affective states and attitudes. This study specifically examined the moderating role of coping strategies in the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and job attitudes. Findings suggest that exposure to workplace bullying negatively impacts job satisfaction and affective commitment. Coping strategies play a very limited moderator role in the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and job attitudes. Instead, coping strategies directly relate to job attitudes above and beyond the exposure to workplace bullying exposure. Theoretical and intervention implications are discussed.

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Author Biography

Jingpei Jillian Lim, University of Houston

Jingpei J. C. Lim is a communication specialist working for an international firm in

Houston, Texas. She earned her master's degree at the University of Houston, USA.